Bachelor's 

General Education Curriculum

English Composition (2 Courses minimum):

Union Institute & University recognizes that an ability to interpret and express ideas in a coherent, organized manner is a competency necessary to responsible citizens, just as it is necessary in advanced college courses. At least two foundational courses that address English composition skills are required, at the conclusion of which students are expected to be able to use the basic mechanics of language effectively and to be able to write basic research papers.

Show DetailsCollege Writing
ENG 1014 credits

This course focuses on developing composition skills and writing techniques. Students will practice planning, drafting, and revising effective, well-organized expository and argumentative essays. Students will demonstrate an ability to use language effectively and to express themselves clearly. (satisfies general education credit in the English Composition Area)
Show DetailsWriting & Research
ENG 1024 credits

This course focuses on further development of composition skills and introduces skills needed when conducting library and Internet research. Students will learn to select a viable research topic, develop a thesis statement, and locate and evaluate sources of information. Topics covered also include methods of organization and development, principles of basic research, and the elements of style. (satisfies general education credit in the English Composition Area)
Show DetailsResearch & Rhetoric
ENG 3024 credits

Building on skills developed in previous composition/exposition/rhetoric courses, this course integrates advanced research in rhetoric with further exploration of the scholarly apparatus needed for academic research. The student will compare and contrast various contemporary modes of recovering information and then apply the resultant sources in the composition of an extended research paper. (satisfies general education credit in the English Composition area)

Mathematics/Statistics (1 course minimum):

Union Institute & University values critical and creative thinking, a process that encompasses both creative exploration of ideas and analytical methods that support a position with appropriate evidence. At least one foundational course in mathematics and/or statistics is required, resulting in development of analytical thinking and quantitative reasoning.

Show DetailsCollege Mathematics
MAT 1014 credits

This course focuses on the development of analytical thinking skills. It covers a broad range of mathematical topics that have general applications in everyday life, as well as specific application in upper-level courses requiring the development and interpretation of qualitative and quantitative information. The areas covered are college-level foundational topics in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and probability and statistics (satisfies general education credit in the Mathematics and Statistics Area).
Show Details College Algebra
MAT 1224 credits

The course prepares students for upper-level courses requiring algebra. Topics covered include the metric system, algebra, linear algebra, polynomial equations, and the binomial theorem (satisfies general education credit in the Mathematics and Statistics Area).
Show DetailsStatistics
STAT 2214 credits

This course covers concepts of probability theory, random variables and their distributions, sampling theory, understanding variation, and testing for differences in sample means. Emphasis is on practical work applications and the display and interpretation of data used in organizations to test for stability and improvement of work processes. (satisfies general education credit in the Mathematics and Statistics Area).
Show DetailsStatistical Process Control & Improvement
STAT 3224 credits

This course focuses on statistical methods used to determine if processes are predictable or not and the similarities and differences of improving predictable versus unpredictable processes. It covers the concepts of central tendency, understanding variation, sampling theory, probability theory, and testing for differences in sample means. Through the selection, development, and analysis of a work-related project, emphasis is placed on real, practical applications. (satisfies general education credit in the Mathematics and Statistics area).

Social/Behavioral Sciences (2 courses minimum, each in a different subject area):

Union Institute & University recognizes that an ability to interpret and express ideas in a coherent, organized manner is a competency necessary to responsible citizens, just as it is necessary in advanced college courses. At least two foundational courses that address English composition skills are required, at the conclusion of which students are expected to be able to use the basic mechanics of language effectively and to be able to write basic research papers.

Show DetailsIntro to Cultural Anthropology
ANT 1014 credits

Cultural Anthropology covers the unity and diversity of human societies, including the study of culture change; adaptability; innovation and group processes; communication and language acquisition; the life cycle; religion and symbolism; variations in political and economic systems; kinship; ecology; large-scale social phenomena and subsistence patterns. (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavioral Science area)
Show DetailsMacroeconomics
ECO 2214 credits

Macroeconomics examines the economy as a whole and offers a perspective on how government economic policies affect daily life. The course focuses on inflation, unemployment, the business cycle, the market system, fiscal policy, supply and demand, the balance of trade, comparative advantage, and money and banking. It also compares Keynesian and Classical economic theories as they relate to macroeconomic policy. (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavioral Science area)
Show DetailsMicroeconomics
ECO 2224 credits

Microeconomics introduces the part of economics which studies how individuals make decisions and choices under conditions of scarcity. The course focuses on the concepts of individual market behavior, rational self-interest, cost benefit analysis, the role of supply and demand in determination of value resource allocation, and comparative advantage. Microeconomics also examines the issues of economic growth, population growth, and the environment. (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavioral Science area)
Show DetailsWestern Civilization: 1500-1815
HIS 1034 credits

This course covers the period of Western Civilization from the end of the Renaissance to the Age of Napoleon. It includes such topics as the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation, French Absolutism and English Parliamentary Monarchy, the early Industrial Revolution in Great Britain, the French Revolution and the rise and fall of Napoleon Bonaparte. It also addresses other political, economic, and cultural developments during this period (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavior Science area).
Show DetailsWestern Civilization: 1815-present
HIS 1044 credits

This course covers the period of Western Civilization from just after Napoleon's fall to the present time. It includes such topics as Victorian England's industrial growth and its expanding colonial empire, the unification of Germany and its conflict with France, World War I, the rise of Communism and Fascism, World War II, the Cold War, and present day challenges. (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavioral Science area)
Show DetailsUS History-1865
HIS 1054 credits

This course covers the history of the United States from the period of discovery through the Civil War, and includes such topics as the Revolutionary War, establishment of a government and constitution, territorial expansion, foreign relations, and domestic policies. It also addresses other political, economic, and cultural developments. (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavioral Science area)
Show DetailsUS History- 1865-present
HIS 1064 credits

This course covers the history of the United States from the period after the Civil War to the present, including such topics as Emancipation and Reconstruction, the effects of the rise of industry, reform and social change, participation in wars abroad, the Depression, and recent political, economic, social, and cultural developments. (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavioral Science area)
Show DetailsIntro to Political Science
POS 1034 credits

This course introduces the basic concepts and theories of political science with an emphasis on political ideologies and comparative political systems. This knowledge will be applied to develop critical thinking skills about politics, law, government and society. The learning objectives will be accomplished through reading a core political science textbook and by exploring a variety of topics in political science. (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavioral Science area)
Show DetailsAmerican Government
POS 2014 credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to the structure and function of the United States government. Knowledge about the U.S. Constitution and political culture is then applied to develop critical thinking skills about American politics and legal society. (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavioral Science area)
Show DetailsIntro to Psychology
PSY 1014 credits

The course is an overview of psychology and integrates the multiple schools of thought and sub-disciplines along with the important findings of each. The student will gain an understanding through critical analysis of topics and themes such as senses and perception; memory; language, cognition; emotion and behavior; human development; health and stress; personality; pathology; therapies and treatment. A main focus of this course is on the scientific method, which allows the student to evaluate and interpret a mixture of speculation, logical deduction, and empirical data collection. (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavioral Science area)
Show DetailsIntro to Sociology
SOC 1014 credits

This survey course examines society in terms of the interactions of groups and cultures including a consideration of family, government, education, religion, culture, society and perspectives derived through the investigation of sociological foundations, major social change movements and their causes, and social traditions both within the United States and the outside world. (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavioral Science area)
Show DetailsSocial Problems
SOC 2034 credits

This course is designed to introduce various theoretical propositions and causal models to allow the student to examine specific social problems in American society and to understand how solving one social problem can also help ameliorate another social problem. (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavioral Science area)
Show DetailsMarriage & Family
SOC 2044 credits

This course includes an examination of family development and the variables that affect its life cycle. The course places primary emphasis on understanding of factors conducive to successful marital and family relations. The course analyzes a balance between the sociological and ecological or family systems theoretical perspectives, while including coverage of family dynamics and interpersonal relationships. Students examine problem-solving and communication patterns, and rich variations in different temporal, structural, and socio-cultural contexts. (satisfies general education credit in the Social and Behavioral Science area)

Arts/Humanities (2 courses minimum, each in a different subject area):

Union Institute & University values critical thinking and the exploration of ideas and issues from multiple perspectives. Foundational courses in the arts and humanities develop an ability to interpret, analyze, and evaluate ideas expressed by various cultures, whether in systems of thought or in works of art. At least two courses representing two different disciplines are required, selected from the following areas: art, film, music, theatre, literature, history, philosophy, ethics, and religion.

Show DetailsArt Appreciation
ART 1104 credits

This course explores the themes, design elements and principles, various media, and history of art. Students will develop their own aesthetic values through exposure to the treasure house of art throughout the past and around the world and will gain an understanding of the social contexts in which works of art are created (satisfies general education credit in the Arts and Humanities Area).
Show DetailsIntro to Poetry
ENG 1444 credits

This course provides an introduction to poetry as a distinct literary genre. While focusing particularly on English language poetry and poetry translated into English, and examining a variety of themes, forms, movements and poets —both canonical and non-canonical—particular attention will be given to contextualizing the texts encountered within the spectrum of world literature. (satisfies general education credit in the Arts and Humanities Area).
Show DetailsIntro to Fiction
ENG 1464 credits

This course introduces fiction, with an emphasis on developing skills in analyzing and interpreting novels and short stories from different periods and national literatures. Students will read works demonstrating a variety of styles, subjects, and formal approaches. (satisfies general education credit in the Arts and Humanities Area).
Show DetailsMusic Appreciation
MUS 1014 credits

This course focuses on developing an appreciation of music and an understanding of some of the basic elements of music, including forms and compositional techniques from different periods. The course will cover world music from the medieval and renaissance periods to the present, including such modern forms as jazz and rock. Students will develop listening skills while listening to musical examples of all of the periods. (satisfies general education credit in the Arts and Humanities Area).
Show DetailsEthics & Social Responsibility
PHI 1104 credits

This course explores ethical issues and dilemmas facing us individually and as a society. Students will apply philosophical approaches to questions of right and wrong, duty and obligation, good and evil. Students will analyze and evaluate issues affecting our world at the global level and at personal, local community, and business levels. This course enables students to use personal experiences in order to develop and/or expand critical thinking skills. (satisfies general education credit in the Arts and Humanities Area).
Show DetailsIntro to Philosophy
PHI 2014 credits

The student will become familiar with the various kinds of philosophical thinking through this survey of the different branches of philosophy, such as ethics, knowing, metaphysics, cosmology, religion, aesthetics, and logic. The focus will be on the introduction of the philosophical point of view through the exploration of some key philosophers, beginning with Plato. (satisfies general education credit in the Arts and Humanities Area).
Show DetailsIntro to Religion
REL 1014 credits

This introductory course will explore a variety of religions and questions fundamental to the study of religion. The student will consider the nature of religious experience and how religion shapes the actions of individuals and communities (satisfies general education credit in the Arts and Humanities Area).
Show DetailsCrime Fiction
ENG 1504 credits

This course focuses on crime fiction, especially as it developed/develops in American literature. Given particular attention will be the detective/hardboiled, or noir novel, with readings from classic, contemporary and developing examples of the genre. (satisfies general education credit in the Arts and Humanities Area)
Show DetailsA Survey of World Literature
ENG 2054 credits

This course surveys world literature with a focus on literature as a reflection of diverse cultures. Literature representing various forms, including poetry, fiction, drama, and the essay, will be read. A comparative study of literary themes and expression will be pursued with special attention given to works by authors from Africa, Asia, and Latin America, and to the effects of colonialism on literature. (satisfies general education credit in the Arts and Humanities Area).
Show DetailsIntro to Film Studies
FAR 1014 credits

This course surveys the development of film during the sound era in the U.S. and abroad, with a consideration of the contributions of technological advances to the medium. Students will view and analyze films that represent a variety of styles and themes and will discuss them as reflections of society. (satisfies general education credit in the Arts and Humanities Area).
Show DetailsFolklore of Childbirth
HUM 2204 credits

Explore birth and breastfeeding in different cultures around the world and throughout history. This course will provide the student with a sense of social and cultural settings, as well as procedures, surrounding childbirth in traditional communities. We will then examine examples of truth and folklore within modern obstetrics. (satisfies general education credit in the Arts and Humanities Area).
Show DetailsCritical Thinking
PHI 2104 credits

This course is an introduction to the philosophical principles of critical thinking and moral reasoning. This course emphasizes making practical decisions about issues that have ethical or moral implications while applying critical thinking in the context of the student’s academic, professional, and/or career development. (satisfies general education credit in the Arts and Humanities Area).

Natural Sciences (2 courses minimum, each in a different subject area):

Union Institute & University recognizes the importance of the processes that govern the natural world and the value of developing lifelong students who can understand scientific explanations and discoveries that impact us all. Foundational courses in the natural sciences provide not only content knowledge, but also engage undergraduate students in the process of inquiry used to demonstrate an understanding of the world as sets of interactive and interrelated systems. At least two science courses are required in different disciplines and selected from the following areas: biology, physics, environmental science, geology, physical geography, and chemistry, etc.

Show DetailsHuman Biology
BIO 2214 credits

This course presents an introduction to the structure and function of tissues and organs of the human body. Topics include human tissues, organs and organ systems, genetics, microbiology and immunology (satisfies general education credit in the Natural Science Area).
Show DetailsEnvironmental Science
ENV 2014 credits

This introductory-level physical science course focuses on global climate change, natural resources, population issues, and pollution and waste management. While this is not a mathematics intensive course, one goal of this course is to introduce the student to the scientific method. To help the student understand the scientific method, the student will complete analytical assignments using real world data (satisfies general education credit in the Natural Science Area).
Show DetailsIntro to Earth Science
GEO 1204 credits

This introductory-level physical science course is an interdisciplinary course combining concepts from geology, oceanography, and meteorology. Topics include the earth processes such as earthquakes, volcanoes, global climate change, hurricanes, coastal processes, and the hydrologic cycle. (satisfies general education credit in the Natural Science Area).
Show DetailsIntro to Physical Science
PHS 1104 credits

This introductory-level science course introduces the student to the fundamental properties of energy and matter. Topics include fundamental concepts of physics, chemistry, astronomy, and geology. While this is not a mathematics intensive course, one goal of this course is to introduce the student to the scientific method. To help the student understand the scientific method, the student will complete analytical assignments using real world data. (satisfies general education credit in the Natural Science Area).
Show DetailsIntro to Astronomy
PHS 1114 credits

This introductory-level physical science course includes a general survey of astronomy. Topics include the sun and planets, evolution of the solar system, galaxies/nebulae, and stellar evolution. (satisfies general education credit in the Natural Science Area).